Anteater Open, Newport Harbor

POSTED BY LIZ HENRY

The UCSD Tritons competed at the Anteater Open February 18-19, hosted by University of California Irvine at Newport Harbor Yacht Club. Twenty-five individual vessels competed from 12 different schools with USC clenching the top two spots.  A torrential downpour, coupled with gusting winds was forecasted for this year’s annual Anteater Open. Our team of collegiate sailors slept bunkered down in San Diego Friday night due to one of the strongest storms to hit California in the last decade. Luckily for us (and our worried mothers), the weather cleared and the regatta commenced with little to no postponement. Apart from the residual shifty, gusty winds, the Newport Harbor turning basin, posed several new obstacles which made the races a little more, let’s say, interesting. Moored yachts, strong currents, and dead zones dominated the windward part of the course while a neighboring fleet of racing Harbor 20s compounded the frenzy of caffeinated, competitive sailors. UC San Diego scored well with boats placing 8th, 11th, 18th, and 22nd with the team overall finishing 5th. Skippers Yan Rui Goheen, Erika Barth, Brett Farrell, Sam Rohrbach, and Natalie Hopper all had finishes within the top 5 boats. Shock ‘em Tritons!

As our team has still much to learn, the unexpected dimensions of this regatta were challenging but good experience. The wind shifts, currents, and larger racing boats (some of which had the audacity to call right of way on port tack) all presented new valuable experiences.

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UC San Diego Hosts the Jeff Simon Memorial Regatta

POSTED BY LIZ HENRY

UC San Diego hosted the Jeff Simon Memorial Regatta this past weekend at the Mission Bay Yacht Club. Eleven schools gathered for a total of twenty-seven boats at the start line, blessed with light winds and warm conditions. Saturday had consistent winds of 9-12 knots while Sunday started off with a lull until there was enough wind (~10 knots) to get day two of the competition rolling. CPSLO took home their first team win with a total of 44 points, followed by USC and UCSB. UC San Diego had four boats competing, one of which finished in 7th place! SDSU made their first appearance at the Western Conference competitions and by the look of it, seemed to have a swell time; one of the skippers did jump out of the boat in joy when he finished top five in one of the races, after all. It was a successful regatta to start the 2017 season on the mainland, and all proceeds were donated to a good cause, the Autism Tree Project Foundation.

It is one thing to tune the sails and direction of the boat per instruction, and another to adjust accordingly in response to how the wind behaves. As someone who only learned how to tie her first knot at the beginning of this school year, this was a huge revelation. Last quarter’s racing consisted mainly of being buried under the sails and completely overwhelmed as my skipper laughed at me and patiently instructed how I should hold what. Sometimes it resulted in capsizing, or at least perilously a-boat to be. Eventually, I started untangling myself from my mistakes (and sheets) to pop my head up from under the deck and sea for the first time what it is that made my skipper the best in town. Just like a child in a bilingual household innately knows the rules of language, Erika grew up in a sailing family and therefore spoke the language of boat physics and wind. Her depth of understanding for the relationship between the two is so deep, certainly deeper than the depths of Mission Bay, which made her a formidable sailor in the lineup. It is always fun sailing with her because she will say something foreign like, “wind shift,” which meant nothing to me whatsoever in the beginning of the year but now I’m starting to associate the terms with a specific feeling of air movement. Basically, my skipper and my time on the FJ made me start to notice things that I never did before and opened up a whole new perspective for me.

Sailing in the Jeff Simon Memorial Regatta translated the effort from practices into real results and buoy did it feel good! I had the opportunity to sail with several different skippers and they all had their moments; from Jason and I finally getting the roll tack right in the middle of the race (we capsized trying a roll tack before the races began) to Fisher and I beginning the race dead last after missing the whistle but somehow catching half the fleet before we finished. With Erika, we placed third in two of the races; she makes everything look so easy, such smooth sailing, and now I can really appreciate just how awesome she is. All in all, what matters was that we were out there sailing. One could call that sea-zing the day.

Sarah Imai

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UC San Diego Sailing Team’s Final Regatta of the Quarter

POSTED BY LIZ HENRY

This weekend I had the opportunity to join the sailing team in Santa Barbara for our final regatta of the quarter. The UC San Diego sailing team has not only provided me a truly awesome outlet for stress, but has also helped me find a close knit family of people that I know I can always count on and always learn from. For me, this weekend involved a lot of learning.  I spent all of Saturday as crew for Grant, one of the skippers. He was able to highlight the importance of being a good crew and point out a lot of flaws that by the end of the weekend, I had already noticed myself revising. These revisions allowed us to improve our placement a lot. On average, we placed 10th or 11th out of 18; however, one rough start caused us to begin the race in last place. Due to my improving crew skills, and Grant’s guidance we were able to gain enough ground to still finish 10th which has very uncommon in my experience (gaining that many places). This experience really solidified my love for both the sport of sailing, and the community that the sailing team has created. Continuing on the topic on family, I grew shocking close to the people who endured the pain of a 6 hour car ride to and from Santa Barbara. With the help of good music, awful puns, and new phone games we managed to have a great time and grow closer with a few more specific people on the team, one of which has decided to ensure I’ll have a potato with me at all sailing events (Don’t ask me why, I don’t really know).  Last time I was in Santa Barbara, I got a speeding ticket…needless to say; this time has given me far superior memories. I truly couldn’t have asked for a more enjoyable weekend. Congratulations to Stanford for winning the regatta. Tritons finished 18th in Varsity and 11th, 13th, 14th, and 18th in JV.

Canyon Breyer

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Cardinal Invite & Women’s PCCS

POSTED BY LIZ HENRY

The UC San Diego Sailing Team went all the way up to Stanford University on October 29 and 30 to compete in their competition. They had 2 boats in both the Women’s Pacific Coast Championships and Cardinal Invite regatta. The women placed seventh overall while the Co-ed team placed thirteenth and sixteenth respectively.  These were unique regattas because there were no rotations, meaning the UCSD team sailed for 6+ hours straight! It was tiring but a lot of fun!

The first day didn’t have any wind so some races were abandoned because nobody was moving. However, the second day had so much wind that multiple boats capsized. Luckily none of the UCSD boats in the Cardinal Invite capsized and only one of the women’s boats capsized. UCSD also sailed two different types of boats, a California Flying Junior (CFJ) and a Z420. These are new regattas recently added to the Triton’s conference to familiarize the West Coast with boats also sailed in the East Coast conference. Therefore, a lot of the sailors, had never sailed Z420s. They provide difficulties as they are slightly bigger and have less maneuverability but travel faster.

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Stony Burke

POSTED BY LIZ HENRY

The UC San Diego sailing team traveled to Treasure Island in San Francisco this weekend, October 15th, to compete in UC Berkeley’s Stoney Burke regatta. Ranging from UC Irvine to the University of British Colombia, forty-two boats from eighteen different schools came to compete in varsity, women’s, and JV divisions. Neither day of the event had consistent wind conditions. A storm rolled through the area on Saturday, with a strange southerly breeze consistently ten knots but ranging up to and beyond twenty-five knots. Fortunately, the rain did not set in until after the racing ended so we were able to sail four races per division, but not without many capsizes and crashes! On Sunday, however, there was a persistent rain throughout the day and wind that ranged from five to twenty-five knots. Even with these inconsistent conditions, the race committee was able to finish three races per division. Congratulations to UC Santa Barbara for winning the varsity division and to USC for winning the JV division! UC San Diego had two boats in varsity, one of which competed in the women’s division as well. The women’s boat finished in 21st and the coed boat finished just behind in 22nd.

This year we are trying to expand and improve our women’s team. The team was fortunate enough to have acquired multiple experienced women sailors this year and last so we can compete at women’s events. Since the team is comprised of both experienced and less experienced sailors, it is very exciting to see the team do so well, especially in such harsh conditions. This regatta was the first of many women’s events this year and we are looking forward to improving and competing in them!

Natalie Hopper
UC San Diego Sailing

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UC San Diego Open/Frosh-Soph Regattas

POSTED BY LIZ HENRY

The UC San Diego Sailing Team was thrilled to once again host the opening fleet racing regatta of the season for the Pacific Coast Collegiate Sailing Conference! It was a sunny weekend out on beautiful Mission Bay and we had ten schools in attendance, from UC Berkeley all the way to Arizona State. The UC San Diego Frosh-Soph regatta is a fun, relaxed competition aimed at introducing new athletes to the sport of sailing, and only sailors in their first or second year of college sailing are eligible. The UC San Diego Open is run side by side with Frosh-Soph for the upperclassmen. Racing started at 11am sharp on Saturday, with a steady 7 knot ocean breeze. Running the two regattas side by side with a total of 31 boats on the same, small race course can be challenging, but thanks to our great race committee volunteers we were able to run 10 races. The wind picked up around midday and everyone was surprised by a moderate breeze seldom seen on the bay. On Sunday the breeze did not match up, and the races were postponed for a short time in the morning. We finished six races and ended early at 2:00 so the teams visiting from far away could make it home at a reasonable hour. Our team finished 14th, 16th, and 21st in Frosh-Soph, and 5th and 8th in the UC San Diego Open. Donated by our volunteer coach Philip Freedman, this year we now have two perpetual trophies for the winners of our regattas. Congrats to USC for taking home first in Frosh-Soph, and to the Berkeley Bears for winning the UC San Diego Open!

Frosh-Soph has special meaning for me personally, as it was my first ever regatta three years ago when I joined the sailing team. I had little previous experience sailing, and no experience racing before coming to college. The team welcomed me along with a wave of other inexperienced Freshmen. After sailing in my first regatta, I knew that sailing was the sport for me. Now, as a Senior and Captain of the team it is my pleasure to help run the event and introduce our new Triton sailors to the team and sport that have both given me so much over my years at UC San Diego. Go Tritons!!

 

Sam Rohrbach

UC San Diego Sailing

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April 9 & 10 Sailing

POSTED BY MICHAEL ZHONG

South Designate

 

Over the weekend of April 9th-10th, the UC San Diego Sailing team traveled to Long Beach, California to participate in the South Designate, one of the major qualifying regattas of the year. Nine of our members went to participate in the completion, one more than the standard number because one skipper was only able to participate on Sunday. Due to this fact, I sailed with two different skippers over the weekend, a somewhat novel experience as I usually sail with Sam Rohrbach during regattas. On Saturday, I sailed in the B division, crewing for Yan Rui. After a fairly rapid two races by the A division competitors, B went out to sail. On both days, the course consisted of a rather long upwind and downwind leg, but there were no reach marks or other restrictions on out sailing. In the first race, the course became incredibly skewed, as competitors were able to reach to both the upwind and downwind marks. Due to the bizarre angles and some bad luck rounding, we has some trouble on the first race. However after the first race ended the course was fixed and out second race was much better.

 

After another rotation by A division, B division went out once more for a planned two races. The first race of the set was once again mediocre due to a poor start and somewhat skewed race course that favored a port lay line for reaching the windward mark. For the fourth race, we had an incredible start, going pin side and reaching the line well ahead of many of the other competitors who suffered from the line sad, allowing us to sail freely up to the windward mark. Unfortunately, despite rounding the mark third, the wind began to cut out on the downwind leg, causing all the boats to be stuck drifting down the course. After drinking most of the wat to the leeward marl, the race committee chose to abandon the race and towed all the boats back to the dock, ending the first day of sailing.

 

On the second say, I was back to sailing with Sam as we headed out for three races to complete the second and third sets. The weather on the second day proved somewhat less shifty during the races, and the first several races all started fairly square, but the lack of rain during the races made everyone happier. On our first race, we were able to catch a large number of boats despite a somewhat poor start, allowing us to reach the middle of a much divided fleet. The next two races we has somewhat more trouble, as we lost boats on several upwind legs despot passing boats on the downwind legs. After eventually finished the third set of race, we headed back in so that A division could being their third set. After A completed their two races, we headed back out for the final two races of the regatta. During out first race we struggle quite a bit as our jib tension proved too low for an increased level of win, making it difficult for us to point on the upwind legs and causing us to lose boats. However, for out next race we were able to fix the jib tension and other rigging items, allowing us to sail more effectively. As such, out final race proved one of our best, and an excellent way for us to close out the regatta. After we finished, A division headed back out for their final races before the regatta came to a close. All in all, the varsity finished 8th/30 and JV finished 21st/30. UC San Diego placed 5th/17 schools.

 

Christoph Steefel

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April 2 Sailing

POSTED BY MICHAEL ZHONG

St. Francis Interconference Regatta: April 2nd and 3rd

The Stanford Sailing Team hosted the St. Francis Interconference Regatta on the weekend of April 2nd and 3rd, 2016 at the St. Francis Yacht Club in the Marina district of San Francisco. It featured amenities abound, with shower, steam, and sauna rooms (separate).  The sailing location, and its proximity to the Golden Gate Bridge, led to not only a picturesque view of the bridge and Alcatraz Island, but also challenging conditions due to the current going under the bridge and the general waves in the area.

18 colleges from all over the West Coast came to this event, with attendees from as far as the Western Washington University. Races began on the first day at 11:00 AM. With uncharacteristically moderate winds, the course started out with an ebb current coming down on the course and a heavily favored right side on a long course. The race committee was aiming for 18 minute races, but after a 30 minute first race, they soon shortened the course – a first of many course alterations. As the day went on, the wind picked up and the flood current came in, which led to a starboard-rounded windward mark to facilitate the trend of boats keeping to the left side of the course. The increased wind speed also saw a few capsizes. For a while, one boat actually sat turtled at the start line until Jake Zarraonandia from UCI and a race committee member jumped in to right it. A-division and B-division both finished seven races in an exciting day of sailing. After the races, the competitors were provided with chips and dip by the regatta hosts.

The second day of sailing began at 10:00 AM with heavier winds and colder weather. A similar trend in weather occurred, which led to starboard roundings of the windward mark later on in the day. One new factor was the presence of much larger waves, which led to a greater separation of the fleet between the boats that understood how to handle the waves, and those that did not. To counteract the colder weather, some teams brought out barbequing equipment. Hot dogs and other grilled foods became a commonly seen item around the viewing area. The last start was planned for 3:00 PM to allow schools with long drives to get an early start heading back. 13 races were sailed for each division in total, with A and B-division finishing 6 races on the second day. Overall with the two division scores combined, Tritons finished in 17th. Congratulations to UCSB for taking home the win!

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UC San Diego Sailing Team Sets Sail in Hawaii

POSTED BY MICHAEL ZHONG

Over the Martin Luther King Jr. weekend, 10 UC San Diego Sailing Team members travelled to Honolulu, Hawaii to participate in the Pete Wenner Rainbow Invitational, hosted by University of Hawaii. We were excited to see beautiful Hawaii, especially the many of us who had never gone before. On our first full day in Hawaii, the team went on a grueling but rewarding 3.5 hour hike, marching up a ridge to see some wonderful views of the south shore of Oahu. After numerous photographs along the path, we finished up and headed to the beach to enjoy the sun and surf before turning in for the day.

The next day, several of us headed out early in the morning to begin the first day of racing. Due to the large number of sailors who went, each one of us only had a few races to sail, but all of us were looking forward to experiencing the winds in the Hawaiian Lagoon. I joined the Varsity group of sailors on Saturday, our first day of sailing, for several races. The day started with very little wind, but it soon picked up to around 10 knots while shifting to the left, perfect for someone of my light weight. Despite a somewhat rough start to the first race involving a too crowded pin, Nick Delfino and I were able to catch up and pass several other boats. In our second race, an open pin side start helped the both of us to cruise to a top three finish with some of the best sailing I have ever experienced at a regatta. After watching some more excellent sailing from my teammates, I headed back out, this time with Hayley Chong as my skipper. The two of us were able to finish in 13th place thanks to good boat side starts in both of our races together, despite some difficult downwind legs due to a short main sheet. We stayed out for two more races as the wind started to drop and shift back to the right, enjoying ourselves immensely.

After the last few races of the day ended, we headed over to the barbecue hosted by the UH Sailing Team and the regatta’s sponsor, Pete Wenner. After a wonderful dinner, we discovered that we had managed to finish 6th out of 18 overall for the day, as well as our A division boat placing 2nd in its division.

The next day, the JV squad headed out to race. Wind conditions looked less ideal for them, with light winds on the first several races, hampering our heavier teams, and then the wind picked up, making life difficult for the lighter combinations. Despite this, the JV team soldiered on, improving throughout the day in their racing. After sailing was done for the day, everyone gathered together for a team dinner at a Vietnamese restaurant, where we had a delicious meal. The following day, we packed up to leave, visited the beach one last time, and then flew back to San Diego happy to have visited the beautiful island of Oahu.

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Rose Bowl Regatta

POSTED BY MICHAEL ZHONG

On the first weekend of the New Year, January 2-3rd, the Triton sailors competed in the Rose Bowl Regatta in Long Beach, CA. The wind was pretty light on Saturday, causing racing to start later in the day after the wind had gotten a little stronger. The college fleets combined raced only 7 races on Saturday. On Sunday, the wind really picked up compared to the day before, and we were able to get through 9 races total. We placed 21st overall out of 29 boats.

This was my first regatta sailing with my partner Casey, who is a freshman on the team. We took turns skippering the boat, since we both had a lot to learn about ocean sailing. I started out skippering on Saturday in the light wind, and Casey skippered on Sunday in the heavier wind. Even though we didn’t place well, we both learned a ton from each other and the fleet, since we could both give each other advice about how to move around the boat and sharing our racing techniques with each other. We worked mainly on getting good starts to the races and roll tacking – both absolutely essential to being a great racer. Overall, this regatta was the perfect transition between winter break and the start of winter quarter, and a great end to our fall racing season!

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My First Regatta

POSTED BY MICHAEL ZHONG

After years wanting to learn how to sail, but never having a chance to do it back in Brazil, I finally found the perfect place to learn. I have only been part of the UCSD Sailing Team for two weeks but I already love to practice and learn with all the amazing team members. Everyone has an important part on making the team the best I could think of joining!

This weekend, October 10th and 11th, I sailed in my first regatta. It was a great experience! All the schools coming together to do what we love and having a great time while doing it in beautiful sunny Mission Bay.

Racing was intense! It was awesome to feel the speed and the wind. I, as crew, and Morgan, as skipper, were racing for the first time in our positions. Before we even got in the water we talked for about what we were planning to do, how we would do it, and how we would succeed working together. Morgan taught me some techniques I did not yet know and I ended up learning a lot that day even before we started sailing.

Morgan and I managed to deal with difficult wind situations and take advantage of good conditions. At first we were still meeting each other and understanding our responsibilities. We made many mistakes on the first day, and the good thing is that we could recognize them after they happened. Since we had such a good experience working together for the first time on Saturday we raced together again on Sunday. This time analyzing mistakes and figuring out how to improve.

One of my favorite moments of this weekend was the last 10 seconds of my last race. We were having difficulties the whole race. From knots that untied, to boats that got in our way. Me and my teammate synced and tacked perfectly. We got speed and we ended up passing 8 boats.

In general, the Tritons did great for the first regatta of the season. Open got 4th and 9th place with amazing performances of my teammates, especially Nicolas Delfino. Frosh/soph, considering it was the first competition, did well also.12th place by Morgan and I, and 20th place by Casey and Arturo; also 14th place by Jason and Chase and 22nd place by Natalie and Robyn.

Learning a sport I never had contact with before is both exciting and scary. But the teammates make everything a lot easier, always being nice, patient and happy to help. Not only that, but also always being ready to sail and train new sailors. I am now really involved with the club and cannot wait to go back to the water and practice even more with the sailing family.

I went from knowing almost nothing about sailing to actually practicing, knowing knots, and competing. The past two weeks just showed how this next quarter will be full of teamwork, personal growth, hard work and fun.

I feel really lucky to be able to participate in such a great team, for such a great sport, in such a great city.

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PCCSC Men’s Single Handed Conference Champs hosted by USC in Long Beach

POSTED BY MICHAEL ZHONG

Finished 8th/9, full results: http://scores.collegesailing.org/f15/pccsc-men-singlehanded/full-scores/
On September 26-27, 2015, USC hosted the PCCSC Men’s Single Handed Conference Champs off the Belmont Pier in Long Beach. The event was raced in the popular single handed “Laser” with a full rig sail configuration. The Laser sailboat has three different sail plan options to allow sailors of varying weight ranges to compete. The full rig sail is the largest most powerful sail plan with an optimal sailor weight of 160-180 pounds. Weighing in at 130 pounds I was at a huge disadvantage if the breeze picked up. As a dinghy, the Laser sailboat has no weighted keel and the boat must be kept flat and upright using one’s weight which is extended over the sides through the act of hiking; hooking your feet under a central strap to increase the moment created by your weight which counteracts the force of the wind which drives the boat forward. Hiking a sailboat involves working multiple core muscles mostly concentrated in the abs and thighs. This process is very grueling especially over extended periods of time. As the wind increases, a sailor must hike harder and harder to fight the tipping force of the wind and keep the boat moving forward. A heavier sailor has the advantage of being able to keep the boat flatter in big breeze, leading to a large speed advantage over a light sailor who may struggle to hike hard enough to compensate a lack of weight.
Leading up to the event I had my eyes glued on the weather forecast, crossing my fingers for a very light air event. Facing a star-studded lineup of mostly Freshman from Stanford, UC Berkeley, UC Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara City College, and Hawaii (all with several years of experience sailing Laser’s in high school), I knew that my fate at this event was directly linked to the strength of the wind. Unfortunately a deviation from the forecast led to the buildup of a fresh breeze of at least 13 knots on both days. This level of wind led me to be utterly overpowered in the Laser full rig for the majority of the races run throughout the weekend. Thankfully I had mentally prepared myself for the consequences of such a situation. I was undeterred by multiple last place finishes, being relatively at ease with my poor performance due to a high level of understanding and comfort with the predicament I found myself in. Staying calm and mentally cheerful despite the situation, I made huge inroads towards keeping my emotions in check and separate from my performance.
Thankfully at least a handful of races were run in under 8 knot conditions in the morning before the wind had a chance to build to its full strength. Luckily weight optimization works both ways, and these light air conditions allowed my light frame to stay fully powered up and flat out hiking to the max while my heavy competitors were forced to hunker inside the boat closer to the centerline. These conditions helped generate the highlight of my weekend; rocking a near perfect start, flying past my competitors with greater boat speed, and staying in synch with wind shifts upwind to round the top mark in 1st place. Although lack of practice in the laser and slightly rushed tactical mistakes dropped me to 5th place in that race, I proved my poor performance was mostly determined by the strength of the breeze, a variable outside my control. It just so happens the 5th place finish won me the tie-breaker that kept me out of last place leading me to finish 8th/9. Although I had envisioned a more optimistic outcome, I was incredibly content with my comeback in light air on Sunday that saw me reduce a large point deficit from a windy first day, and achieved the evolved goal of not finishing last. Most importantly I am very satisfied with the improved mental head space I am ready to carry into future events this 2015-2016 season.

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Sailing Coed

POSTED BY MICHAEL ZHONG

Over the Martin Luther King Jr. weekend, 10 UC San Diego Sailing Team members travelled to Honolulu, Hawaii to participate in the Pete Wenner Rainbow Invitational, hosted by University of Hawaii. We were excited to see beautiful Hawaii, especially the many of us who had never gone before. On our first full day in Hawaii, the team went on a grueling but rewarding 3.5 hour hike, marching up a ridge to see some wonderful views of the south shore of Oahu. After numerous photographs along the path, we finished up and headed to the beach to enjoy the sun and surf before turning in for the day.

The next day, several of us headed out early in the morning to begin the first day of racing. Due to the large number of sailors who went, each one of us only had a few races to sail, but all of us were looking forward to experiencing the winds in the Hawaiian Lagoon. I joined the Varsity group of sailors on Saturday, our first day of sailing, for several races. The day started with very little wind, but it soon picked up to around 10 knots while shifting to the left, perfect for someone of my light weight. Despite a somewhat rough start to the first race involving a too crowded pin, Nick Delfino and I were able to catch up and pass several other boats. In our second race, an open pin side start helped the both of us to cruise to a top three finish with some of the best sailing I have ever experienced at a regatta. After watching some more excellent sailing from my teammates, I headed back out, this time with Hayley Chong as my skipper. The two of us were able to finish in 13th place thanks to good boat side starts in both of our races together, despite some difficult downwind legs due to a short main sheet. We stayed out for two more races as the wind started to drop and shift back to the right, enjoying ourselves immensely.

After the last few races of the day ended, we headed over to the barbecue hosted by the UH Sailing Team and the regatta’s sponsor, Pete Wenner. After a wonderful dinner, we discovered that we had managed to finish 6th out of 18 overall for the day, as well as our A division boat placing 2nd in its division.

The next day, the JV squad headed out to race. Wind conditions looked less ideal for them, with light winds on the first several races, hampering our heavier teams, and then the wind picked up, making life difficult for the lighter combinations. Despite this, the JV team soldiered on, improving throughout the day in their racing. After sailing was done for the day, everyone gathered together for a team dinner at a Vietnamese restaurant, where we had a delicious meal. The following day, we packed up to leave, visited the beach one last time, and then flew back to San Diego happy to have visited the beautiful island of Oahu.

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Men’s Singlehanded Champs October 25-26, 2014

POSTED BY MICHAEL ZHONG

On the first weekend of the New Year, January 2-3rd, the Triton sailors competed in the Rose Bowl Regatta in Long Beach, CA. The wind was pretty light on Saturday, causing racing to start later in the day after the wind had gotten a little stronger. The college fleets combined raced only 7 races on Saturday. On Sunday, the wind really picked up compared to the day before, and we were able to get through 9 races total. We placed 21st overall out of 29 boats.

This was my first regatta sailing with my partner Casey, who is a freshman on the team. We took turns skippering the boat, since we both had a lot to learn about ocean sailing. I started out skippering on Saturday in the light wind, and Casey skippered on Sunday in the heavier wind. Even though we didn’t place well, we both learned a ton from each other and the fleet, since we could both give each other advice about how to move around the boat and sharing our racing techniques with each other. We worked mainly on getting good starts to the races and roll tacking – both absolutely essential to being a great racer. Overall, this regatta was the perfect transition between winter break and the start of winter quarter, and a great end to our fall racing season!

 

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Stoney Burke Regatta

POSTED BY MICHAEL ZHONG

Finished 8th/9, full results: http://scores.collegesailing.org/f15/pccsc-men-singlehanded/full-scores/
On September 26-27, 2015, USC hosted the PCCSC Men’s Single Handed Conference Champs off the Belmont Pier in Long Beach. The event was raced in the popular single handed “Laser” with a full rig sail configuration. The Laser sailboat has three different sail plan options to allow sailors of varying weight ranges to compete. The full rig sail is the largest most powerful sail plan with an optimal sailor weight of 160-180 pounds. Weighing in at 130 pounds I was at a huge disadvantage if the breeze picked up. As a dinghy, the Laser sailboat has no weighted keel and the boat must be kept flat and upright using one’s weight which is extended over the sides through the act of hiking; hooking your feet under a central strap to increase the moment created by your weight which counteracts the force of the wind which drives the boat forward. Hiking a sailboat involves working multiple core muscles mostly concentrated in the abs and thighs. This process is very grueling especially over extended periods of time. As the wind increases, a sailor must hike harder and harder to fight the tipping force of the wind and keep the boat moving forward. A heavier sailor has the advantage of being able to keep the boat flatter in big breeze, leading to a large speed advantage over a light sailor who may struggle to hike hard enough to compensate a lack of weight.
Leading up to the event I had my eyes glued on the weather forecast, crossing my fingers for a very light air event. Facing a star-studded lineup of mostly Freshman from Stanford, UC Berkeley, UC Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara City College, and Hawaii (all with several years of experience sailing Laser’s in high school), I knew that my fate at this event was directly linked to the strength of the wind. Unfortunately a deviation from the forecast led to the buildup of a fresh breeze of at least 13 knots on both days. This level of wind led me to be utterly overpowered in the Laser full rig for the majority of the races run throughout the weekend. Thankfully I had mentally prepared myself for the consequences of such a situation. I was undeterred by multiple last place finishes, being relatively at ease with my poor performance due to a high level of understanding and comfort with the predicament I found myself in. Staying calm and mentally cheerful despite the situation, I made huge inroads towards keeping my emotions in check and separate from my performance.
Thankfully at least a handful of races were run in under 8 knot conditions in the morning before the wind had a chance to build to its full strength. Luckily weight optimization works both ways, and these light air conditions allowed my light frame to stay fully powered up and flat out hiking to the max while my heavy competitors were forced to hunker inside the boat closer to the centerline. These conditions helped generate the highlight of my weekend; rocking a near perfect start, flying past my competitors with greater boat speed, and staying in synch with wind shifts upwind to round the top mark in 1st place. Although lack of practice in the laser and slightly rushed tactical mistakes dropped me to 5th place in that race, I proved my poor performance was mostly determined by the strength of the breeze, a variable outside my control. It just so happens the 5th place finish won me the tie-breaker that kept me out of last place leading me to finish 8th/9. Although I had envisioned a more optimistic outcome, I was incredibly content with my comeback in light air on Sunday that saw me reduce a large point deficit from a windy first day, and achieved the evolved goal of not finishing last. Most importantly I am very satisfied with the improved mental head space I am ready to carry into future events this 2015-2016 season.

 

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UCSD Sailing Debut

POSTED BY MICHAEL ZHONG

After years wanting to learn how to sail, but never having a chance to do it back in Brazil, I finally found the perfect place to learn. I have only been part of the UCSD Sailing Team for two weeks but I already love to practice and learn with all the amazing team members. Everyone has an important part on making the team the best I could think of joining!

This weekend, October 10th and 11th, I sailed in my first regatta. It was a great experience! All the schools coming together to do what we love and having a great time while doing it in beautiful sunny Mission Bay.

Racing was intense! It was awesome to feel the speed and the wind. I, as crew, and Morgan, as skipper, were racing for the first time in our positions. Before we even got in the water we talked for about what we were planning to do, how we would do it, and how we would succeed working together. Morgan taught me some techniques I did not yet know and I ended up learning a lot that day even before we started sailing.

Morgan and I managed to deal with difficult wind situations and take advantage of good conditions. At first we were still meeting each other and understanding our responsibilities. We made many mistakes on the first day, and the good thing is that we could recognize them after they happened. Since we had such a good experience working together for the first time on Saturday we raced together again on Sunday. This time analyzing mistakes and figuring out how to improve.

One of my favorite moments of this weekend was the last 10 seconds of my last race. We were having difficulties the whole race. From knots that untied, to boats that got in our way. Me and my teammate synced and tacked perfectly. We got speed and we ended up passing 8 boats.

In general, the Tritons did great for the first regatta of the season. Open got 4th and 9th place with amazing performances of my teammates, especially Nicolas Delfino. Frosh/soph, considering it was the first competition, did well also.12th place by Morgan and I, and 20th place by Casey and Arturo; also 14th place by Jason and Chase and 22nd place by Natalie and Robyn.

Learning a sport I never had contact with before is both exciting and scary. But the teammates make everything a lot easier, always being nice, patient and happy to help. Not only that, but also always being ready to sail and train new sailors. I am now really involved with the club and cannot wait to go back to the water and practice even more with the sailing family.

I went from knowing almost nothing about sailing to actually practicing, knowing knots, and competing. The past two weeks just showed how this next quarter will be full of teamwork, personal growth, hard work and fun.

I feel really lucky to be able to participate in such a great team, for such a great sport, in such a great city.

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Feb 27 & 28 Sailing

POSTED BY MICHAEL ZHONG

Cal Team Race 2016

 

On February 27-28 the Tritons Sailing team competed in the annual Cal Team Race hosted by Berkeley Sailing on Treasure Island. The format was 3v3 team racing, an intense change from normal fleet racing. Gentle winds delayed the start of racing on Saturday, but once the western Bay Area wind filled in the racing was nonstop. The wind built throughout the day to a nice fresh breeze, but never became uncontrollable. With rolling starts 26 races were finished by the end of the day, completing two and a half round robins. Before the wind filled in on Sunday the Berkeley coach gave a chalk talk to all the competitors aimed at increasing the tactical strategy level out on the race course. As a sort of learning event, Cal Team Race is a great regatta for those less familiar with the head to head strategies of team racing. Sunday saw a long postponement due to more light morning winds, even after the chalk talk. The wind eventually filled in from the west, albeit still lightly. The light conditions were more familiar to a team that practices on Mission Bay. All around it was a great learning experience and much improvement on tactics like mark traps and pass backs was seen from all the teams by the end of the regatta. After finishing 4 complete round robins, the UC San Diego team came out with a 3rd place finish. Congratulations to Cal who took home the win at their own event.

 

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Feb 20 Sailing

POSTED BY MICHAEL ZHONG

Anteater Open Regatta

The UC Irvine Sailing Team hosted the Anteater Open Regatta on February 20th and 21st, 2016 at Newport Harbor Yacht Club. 25 boats from ten different colleges competed in a course filled with moored boats and idle buoys. A floating dock near the middle of the course is one of the highlights of the venue. While teams wait on the dock for their turn to sail, they get a close up view of the racing, with boats often tacking only a foot away from the dock. The proximity of the dock to the course also allows for faster rotations and less waiting time between races.

The wind on Saturday was initially light and steadily increased to 8-10 knots throughout the day. The long course and wind shifts led to multiple tacks in the upwind leg, which in turn led to boats crossing and ducking every which way.  Clear air became a priority in order to not be bogged down by a wall of boats to windward. A-division and B-division both finished six races in a hectic day of sailing. On Sunday, the wind was lighter, ranging from 4-8 knots, which was sufficient to finish four more races for A and B division. The lighter conditions on the second day led to more trouble on the starting line. Many boats were unable to speed up before the start and inevitably ended up bunching together and colliding near the ends of the line. Overall with the A and B-division scores combined, the three Triton boats took 4th, 20th, and 22nd. Congratulations to USC for taking home the win!

Our team took many new crew out this weekend to give them an experience in college racing. Racing brings out some aspects of sailing which never really arise in practicing – the camaraderie of facing tough situations together, meeting other teams, and the tension and excitement of passing other boats and trying not to be passed. I’m glad our new members were able to experience a new side of sailing and I look forward to this event next year!

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Nov 14-15 Sailing

POSTED BY MICHAEL ZHONG

Santa Barbara Championship Regatta

by Lauren Liu

I may not be new at sailing, but I am new to the UC San Diego Sailing team. Our Santa Barbara championship regatta is the first time that I traveled with the team to race. We spent some time preparing earlier in the week by loading up a trailer with 3 of the boats we were planning to bring with us. On the day we left, several of us went down to Mission Bay early to load the other 3 boats into a trailer. It was a lot of work to prepare, but we had so many people helping that it was pretty easy to get the job done quickly. After that, we settled into our cars for the long drive to Santa Barbara. Normally a 4 hour drive, it took us about from 11am to 6pm to arrive at the Ocean Mesa campsite, including a break in Irvine for food and gas. Most of us opted to sleep some of the drive and were well rested when we got to the campsite. I absolutely love camping, so I was really looking forward to this portion of the trip. We quickly set up some tents mostly with the help of flashlights, and one of the earlier groups came back from the grocery store with food to make kebabs and corn on the cob over the fire. We cooked the food in various ways with varying degrees of success, but I had a blast getting to know my teammates better.

When we arrived at Santa Barbara Yacht Club on Saturday morning, it was a bit chilly, but very sunny and quickly warmed up. We first rigged five boats and got them ready to launch. The first rotations of skippers and crews sailed the boats over to the course areas while the rest of us brought our bags and canopy over to the viewing point. Unfortunately the wind was so light that day that none of the races could be completed. The good news: UC San Diego tied for first on Saturday. The bad news: I think we were tied with 15 other teams! Almost everyone brought their boats to the beach line next to the viewing area and we waited awhile to see if the wind would pick up. It never really did, so after some fun playing games, munching on food, and playing on the beach, we packed up everything and returned to our campsites for the night.

The forecast for Sunday was a much different story. In the morning, we woke up a little earlier so we could clean up the campsite and load up the cars. It was a good thing too, because a storm rolled in over the mountains later in the morning, bringing wind and rain, and then just rain, and then lots of wind after a brief reprieve for the rest of the afternoon. Almost everyone was soaked and chilled, and the conditions in the morning weren’t kind enough to allow the JV out to race. After the storm let up a bit, the JV was able to get quite a few races in. I’m experienced in sailing and being out on the water in difficult conditions, but I’m still very new (and very bad at) racing, so I was very excited to test myself in the heavier winds. The waters were rough and the winds were gusting, giving me every bit of the challenge I was hoping for. Of the two races I skippered, I capsized going downwind twice and didn’t finish either race. Throughout, I had so much fun learning the limits of my ability as a skipper and bonding with the team. I’m definitely looking forward to spending more time with the team and improving my skills over the rest of the year!

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Nov 14-15 Sailing 2

POSTED BY MICHAEL ZHONG

Fall Pacific Coast Championship

Last weekend, November 14th through the 15th,  the UC San Diego sailing team had the honor of attending the Fall PCC Regatta. The regatta was held off the beautiful coast of the Santa Barbara Yacht Club, and was hosted by the UC Santa Barbara team. Framed against drop back of the coastal mountains, we fit in two incredibly interesting days of sailing.

Nineteen strong with six boats in tow, we made our way up to Santa Barbara in a fleet of over the course of Friday where we camped out under the stars at the Ocean Mesa Campground, which is located in the beautiful, oceanside El Capitan National Park.

Saturday brought idyllic Santa Barbara conditions with blue skies and warm weather. The only element lacking was wind, which did not reach over 3 knots throughout the course of the race day.  Junior Varsity abandoned two attempts at racing before calling it a day. Varsity did not attempt any races and was canceled shortly after. So instead of sailing, the team mostly spent time enjoying what Santa Barbara’s beaches had to offer.

Sunday brought the complete opposite of Saturday’s beautiful weather and hugely varying wind speeds. The beginnings of a storm ushered in winds well in the 20’s. In the morning, when I raced, the winds were cold and it began to rain. For those of us that brought it, we were thankful for our foul weather gear. The choppy waves and strong gusts of wind made for a wild ride. At one point a particularly gust of wind took down five boats in our particular fleet in one fell swoop. My boat was no exception, one moment we were sailing swiftly upwind towards a gybe and in the next a burst of wind scooped our boat up, slammed us back down and we capsized instantly. We had to retire the boat from the race shortly afterwards due to a rapid leak. Eventually the wind, after completely, picked up and the regatta fit in four more solid races.

Varsity finished the Fall PCC in 13th place. JV 1 finished in 8th place, JV 3 finished in 13th place, and the JV 2 boat was retired prematurely for repairs. Overall this was a fantastic regatta for me. I was able to experience both extremes of sailing within one regatta as well as travel to one of the most beautiful places in Southern California. I’m so lucky I was able to sail and travel with such amazing teammates.

Go Tritons!

by Lauren Liu

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Oct 10 Sailing

POSTED BY MICHAEL ZHONG

My First Regatta

 

After years wanting to learn how to sail, but never having a chance to do it back in Brazil, I finally found the perfect place to learn. I have only been part of the UCSD Sailing Team for two weeks but I already love to practice and learn with all the amazing team members. Everyone has an important part on making the team the best I could think of joining!

 

This weekend, October 10th and 11th, I sailed in my first regatta. It was a great experience! All the schools coming together to do what we love and having a great time while doing it in beautiful sunny Mission Bay.

 

Racing was intense! It was awesome to feel the speed and the wind. I, as crew, and Morgan, as skipper, were racing for the first time in our positions. Before we even got in the water we talked for about what we were planning to do, how we would do it, and how we would succeed working together. Morgan taught me some techniques I did not yet know and I ended up learning a lot that day even before we started sailing.

 

Morgan and I managed to deal with difficult wind situations and take advantage of good conditions. At first we were still meeting each other and understanding our responsibilities. We made many mistakes on the first day, and the good thing is that we could recognize them after they happened. Since we had such a good experience working together for the first time on Saturday we raced together again on Sunday. This time analyzing mistakes and figuring out how to improve.

 

One of my favorite moments of this weekend was the last 10 seconds of my last race. We were having difficulties the whole race. From knots that untied, to boats that got in our way. Me and my teammate synced and tacked perfectly. We got speed and we ended up passing 8 boats.

 

In general, the Tritons did great for the first regatta of the season. Open got 4th and 9th place with amazing performances of my teammates, especially Nicolas Delfino. Frosh/soph, considering it was the first competition, did well also.12th place by Morgan and I, and 20th place by Casey and Arturo; also 14th place by Jason and Chase and 22nd place by Natalie and Robyn.

 

Learning a sport I never had contact with before is both exciting and scary. But the teammates make everything a lot easier, always being nice, patient and happy to help. Not only that, but also always being ready to sail and train new sailors. I am now really involved with the club and cannot wait to go back to the water and practice even more with the sailing family.

 

I went from knowing almost nothing about sailing to actually practicing, knowing knots, and competing. The past two weeks just showed how this next quarter will be full of teamwork, personal growth, hard work and fun.

 

I feel really lucky to be able to participate in such a great team, for such a great sport, in such a great city.

 

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Sept 26-27 Sailing

POSTED BY MICHAEL ZHONG

Nicolas Delfino

PCCSC Men’s Single Handed Conference Champs hosted by USC in Long Beach

Finished 8th/9, full results: http://scores.collegesailing.org/f15/pccsc-men-singlehanded/full-scores/

On September 26-27, 2015, USC hosted the PCCSC Men’s Single Handed Conference Champs off the Belmont Pier in Long Beach. The event was raced in the popular single handed “Laser” with a full rig sail configuration. The Laser sailboat has three different sail plan options to allow sailors of varying weight ranges to compete. The full rig sail is the largest most powerful sail plan with an optimal sailor weight of 160-180 pounds. Weighing in at 130 pounds I was at a huge disadvantage if the breeze picked up. As a dinghy, the Laser sailboat has no weighted keel and the boat must be kept flat and upright using one’s weight which is extended over the sides through the act of hiking; hooking your feet under a central strap to increase the moment created by your weight which counteracts the force of the wind which drives the boat forward. Hiking a sailboat involves working multiple core muscles mostly concentrated in the abs and thighs. This process is very grueling especially over extended periods of time. As the wind increases, a sailor must hike harder and harder to fight the tipping force of the wind and keep the boat moving forward. A heavier sailor has the advantage of being able to keep the boat flatter in big breeze, leading to a large speed advantage over a light sailor who may struggle to hike hard enough to compensate a lack of weight.

Leading up to the event I had my eyes glued on the weather forecast, crossing my fingers for a very light air event. Facing a star-studded lineup of mostly Freshman from Stanford, UC Berkeley, UC Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara City College, and Hawaii (all with several years of experience sailing Laser’s in high school), I knew that my fate at this event was directly linked to the strength of the wind. Unfortunately a deviation from the forecast led to the buildup of a fresh breeze of at least 13 knots on both days. This level of wind led me to be utterly overpowered in the Laser full rig for the majority of the races run throughout the weekend. Thankfully I had mentally prepared myself for the consequences of such a situation. I was undeterred by multiple last place finishes, being relatively at ease with my poor performance due to a high level of understanding and comfort with the predicament I found myself in. Staying calm and mentally cheerful despite the situation, I made huge inroads towards keeping my emotions in check and separate from my performance.

Thankfully at least a handful of races were run in under 8 knot conditions in the morning before the wind had a chance to build to its full strength. Luckily weight optimization works both ways, and these light air conditions allowed my light frame to stay fully powered up and flat out hiking to the max while my heavy competitors were forced to hunker inside the boat closer to the centerline. These conditions helped generate the highlight of my weekend; rocking a near perfect start, flying past my competitors with greater boat speed, and staying in synch with wind shifts upwind to round the top mark in 1st place. Although lack of practice in the laser and slightly rushed tactical mistakes dropped me to 5th place in that race, I proved my poor performance was mostly determined by the strength of the breeze, a variable outside my control. It just so happens the 5th place finish won me the tie-breaker that kept me out of last place leading me to finish 8th/9. Although I had envisioned a more optimistic outcome, I was incredibly content with my comeback in light air on Sunday that saw me reduce a large point deficit from a windy first day, and achieved the evolved goal of not finishing last. Most importantly I am very satisfied with the improved mental head space I am ready to carry into future events this 2015-2016 season.

 

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March 19 & 20 Sailing

POSTED BY MICHAEL ZHONG

Western Canada Cup: March 19th and 20th

The UC San Diego Sailing Team attended the Western Canada Cup on March 19th and 20th at the Royal Victoria Yacht Club. With memories of the strong winds and cold water from last year everyone was both weary and excited to race so far from home. This event had 15 boats from 6 different colleges from both Canada and the United States. On Saturday, there were beautiful conditions – a sunny day with light to medium wind speeds. Unfortunately, the wind shifted frequently during races, making it more difficult to race. A division finished 8 races and B division 6 by the end of racing on Saturday. Sunday was similar in terms of weather, but with a little more wind and rain. Both divisions finished 4 more races before the regatta was called early to allow some competitors to make their ferry rides.

Overall, with the A and B division scores combined, the two Triton boats took 6th and 12th. This fleet was highly competitive and we had to fight for every top half finish. Despite this, everyone was very friendly and it was great to meet some new Canadian friends that love to sail as much as I do. I personally finished in 5th in the B division with the help of my crew Warren Ko. Both of us are new to the school and the sailing team this year, so we are extremely happy with this result! Congrats to University of Victoria for taking first place, and also a big thanks to them for hosting such a great event again! I am definitely looking forward to going again next year!

Natalie Hopper

UC San Diego Sailing

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March 5 & 6 Sailing

POSTED BY MICHAEL ZHONG

March 5 & 6: Mustang Open Regatta

 

The weekend of March 5th and 6th, the UC San Diego Sailing Team went to Morro Bay over by San Luis Obispo to compete in the Mustang Open Regatta. This was the second annual Mustang Open that was hosted by Cal Poly San Luis Obispo and Morro Bay Yacht Club. As with last year, hospitality at the club and by the hosts was great, though sailing was a bit different from what our team is used to.

 

Saturday started off rainy and cold with very little wind. The team expected high winds to build later in the day due to wind reports, but thankfully, the wind never built to the level that was projected. Morro Bay usually has a very strong current and this weekend was no different, with the tide going out until the afternoon. With a low level of wind to start out with, boats fought against the current to make it around the course, but as the day went on the tide started to come back in and the current weakened. At the lowest tide, sailors had to avoid the sand bar that was exposed near the windward mark. Throughout the day there were many wind shifts and the race committee was forced to move the course by about 90 degrees a few times as the storm system progressed. In addition, as the day went on it began get windier and rainier. Overall, the wind was not too strong, but it did get very gusty at times. Thankfully not many people capsized on Saturday, though by the end of the racing everyone was wet enough from the rain that capsizing would not have changed much. Saturday night, the Cal Poly sailing team and some yacht club members hosted a spaghetti dinner to fundraise for the Cal Poly team.

 

Sunday brought sunny skies and more constant wind. Racing was done at the south end of the bay once again, where the current was still very strong. Each fleet had several general recalls as they struggled to fight against the current at the start. The race committee brought out the I-flag, and when that failed to prevent boats from starting over-early, the race committee brought out the Z-flag (they did not have a black flag on the race committee boat, otherwise they probably would have used that too). Race committee had to postpone for a little while right before the last two races in order to move the course to fit both the wind and the water available for sailing since the course we had been racing on had shrunk as the tide went out.

 

At the end of the weekend, the UC San Diego Sailing Team had a good weekend and enjoyed competing in Morro Bay, even though it was a challenge at times. Tritons 1 ended up in 4th place overall out of 19 boats, with a first place finish in A division! Tritons 2 were 11th, and Tritons 3 were 18th. A big thank you to Cal Poly SLO and Morro Bay Yacht Club for hosting the regatta, and to Katie of the Cal Poly SLO team and Joe and Dawn Huntsinger for housing our sailors. We look forward to returning next year, when it will hopefully not be raining again.

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Jan 23 Sailing

POSTED BY MICHAEL ZHONG

Jeff Simon Memorial Regatta

The UC San Diego Sailing Team hosted the Jeff Simon Memorial Regatta on January 23rd and 24th, 2016 at Mission Bay Yacht Club. This regatta is an annual memorial of former team captain Jeff Simon who tragically passed away at 22 from cancer. Besides the racing, every year the UC San Diego team holds a raffle with donated prizes to raise money for the John Wayne Cancer Foundation.

19 boats from eight different colleges met both days on the starting line in the middle of Mission Bay. A-division started the first race on an overcast Saturday in light wind. The wind shifted frequently throughout the whole weekend, causing the race committee to adjust the race course often; however there were only a couple short delays due to a lack of wind speed—something that can plague regattas held in Mission Bay from time to time. The tidal swings were severe on Saturday causing a very strong current along the race course in the downwind direction. Consequently, some of the less experienced boats struggled to race upwind on the course. A-division and B-division both finished six races in a great day of sailing. One protest was heard after the racing resulting in a disqualification for a Cal-Poly boat in the fourth race of A-division. The wind was more consistent on Sunday and the sky opened up to a bright, sunny day. The UCLA Sailing Team even brought out a foil-lined box to try and solar cook s’mores! Four races were completed by each division on Sunday. Overall with the A and B-division scores combined the four Triton boats took 4th, 12th, 13th, and 16th. I personally finished tied for 8th place in A-division which is a huge improvement from my 18th place finish last year in the same regatta. I couldn’t have done it without my new crew Christoph Steefel. Congratulations to USC for taking home the win! This year the Jeff Simon Memorial Regatta has a trophy that will have the names of the winning sailors engraved onto the side.

Our team has done some major recruiting this year, so we have a large group of new sailors. We prescribe to the trial by fire training technique in which we encourage everybody to race, even sailors who have stepped foot on a boat only once. This quarter we have a handful of new sailors with minimal experience and hosting a regatta on home turf afforded us the chance to get everyone racing who wanted to. On Saturday I sailed a set of races with a new team member, Maddie Wilson. She did great for her first time racing and I hope she learned a few things from being tossed straight into the deep end. Two of our other boats also had brand new sailors. It wasn’t long ago that I was exactly in their shoes. In my first week on the team two years ago we hosted a regatta and I was put into a boat to race with nearly no dinghy sailing experience. I have to thank the older members of the team who really taught me to race, because now I am fortunate enough to be able to spread the knowledge again down to new sailors. I’m also very glad that our new teammates are bold enough to just jump into a sport that can have very stressful competition.

This event was a great success and I’m looking forward to next year’s! I’d also like to give a big thanks to the companies and individuals who donated prizes for the raffle, and to alumni Ryan Lorence, Charlie Davidson, John Olson, and Chris Keefe for running the race committee on such a shifty weekend!

 

Sam Rohrbach

Captain, UC San Diego Sailing

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